The things I don’t love about living in Australia

This blog is all about balance. This blog is all about keeping it real. I told you the things I love about living in Australia, now it’s time for the not so good stuff. In the spirit of openness and transparency, here are the things that I don’t love about living in Australia.

Sometimes expat life isn't all roses - nowhere is perfect, so I'm sharing what I don't love about my new home country of Australia. See more at www.anestingnomad.com

It gets dark really quickly

Nights fall super fast in Australia. I’m used to the long twilight of the UK, particularly in summer (in the winter you don’t really notice it because it falls so early…). But here, it seems like it it bright sunshine one minute, and dark the next. If you want to enjoy the sunset somewhere, you’d better have your wits about you. And I find it makes me feel like I need to be going to bed far too early! To me, it being still hot at 8pm and also pitch black is very bizarre.

Sometimes expat life isn't all roses - nowhere is perfect, so I'm sharing what I don't love about my new home country of Australia. See more at www.anestingnomad.com

Taken at 6.15pm in September. About three minutes later, it was pitch black.

The cockroaches

You guys, they FLY. Enough said.

Drivers are not good

I don’t mean to go on a driving related rant here because nobody likes those. But drivers here tailgate so badly, drive unnecessarily aggressively, and regularly fail to indicate. It honestly makes me, normally a very confident driver, not want to get out on the roads at all. It doesn’t help that a lot of people here drive big SUVs or utes; seeing your entire rearview mirror full of grille is quite terrifying. What if someone then switches lane suddenly in front of you without indicating? What do you do??

Public transport is not good

So you decide you’re not going to risk it on the roads but instead will take public transport. Good luck with that. For a new city, things seem to have been cobbled together rather rapidly and without a great deal of thought. So you’ve got bus stops in the middle of motorways/freeways. Bus lanes crossing traffic. No cycle lanes. No metro/underground. Small patches with great and regular train options (luckily the case where we live, which is why we picked it) and huge swathes of the city nowhere near any trains whatsoever. New train stations are being planned with no parking. No real viable intercity travel. Definitely no high speed trains or anything modern like that. No real future planning. Heck, they’re just rebuilding the tram system (at huge expense and disruption) that they tore out 50 years ago. I don’t get it.

Sometimes expat life isn't all roses - nowhere is perfect, so I'm sharing what I don't love about my new home country of Australia. See more at www.anestingnomad.com

The trains are double decker though. That’s pretty cool.

Bushfires are scary

I still don’t really understand bushfires – in terms of, if you’ve never grown up with any sort of extreme weather/nature scenarios, it’s hard to fully appreciate them. I think most kids here are brought up with the knowledge of what to do if there’s a bushfire near you, but at the moment I feel totally uneducated and likely to do exactly the wrong thing should something bad happen. I live in the middle of a built up area so I’m pretty sure my fire risk is very small, but it’s definitely a risk eg when we’re travelling to more remote areas. Basically, bushfires terrify me.

House prices

I’ve banged on enough about this so I’ll keep it brief. I know it’s bad for the economy and whatnot but I secretly hope for a house price ‘correction’ so folks my age can stand a chance of getting on the property ladder. When the very ordinary flat you rent is worth $1.5m you just think why even bother?

Believe it or not, this hovel property sold recently for just over $1m. Which was over the guide price, may I add. Don’t believe me? Check out the property info here. It makes me wonder what kind of nutty city we live in where a 2 bed, 1 bath dilapidated shell (that requires you to sign a waiver before you walk inside!) sells for over the estimated value of a million dollars.

And on that mind boggling fact, I’m off to go and cry into my smashed avo*.

What do you not love about where you live? Dish, I’m nosy.

-Rachel

*Sydneysider in-joke. Apparently us millennials are spending all our money on avocado on toast and that’s the whole reason we can’t afford property. Not the fact that the required deposit for this particular hovel would be $200,000 (in order to avoid paying loan protection insurance of up to 4%). Don’t forget your stamp duty of nearly $41,000 and other buying costs so let’s round that up to an even total cash requirement of $250k in savings for the pleasure of buying a home you can’t even walk into without wearing full-body PPE.

Sometimes expat life isn't all roses - nowhere is perfect, so I'm sharing what I don't love about my new home country of Australia. See more at www.anestingnomad.com 

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